Five Attention-Grabbing Ways to Get Hired

*By Barbara Pronin, RISMedia Columnist

 
In today’s economy, according to business consultant Jim Kukral, you need to be more than experienced, qualified, and personable to get the job you want. You need to stand out from the crowd, approaching your job search in ways that grab –and hold – attention.

“No employer today is going to remember someone who falls in the middle of the pack,” says Kukral, whose book, “Attention! This Book Will Make You Money,” instructs individuals and businesses in the art of using creativity and the Web to find success.

Kukral offers five ways job-seekers can stand out from the crowd:

Ramp up your resume – To most hiring managers, resumes look pretty much the same. Make yours stand out by delivering it in a catchy, unusual way – maybe attached to a box of donuts delivered to the CEO’s office, or on a bulletin board covered with post-it notes describing your most distinctive qualities.
Try a Facebook ad – Facebook offers an inexpensive advertising service that allows you to create your own target ad. Create an ad pointing out your skills, experience and goals – and send it to the companies you want to work for, or specifically to executives of those companies.
Make it personal – Before you go on a job interview, use Facebook, Linked In or other social media sites to learn as much as you can about the interviewer. Is he a golfer, like you? Do her children attend the same school as yours? Do you support or volunteer for the same charity? Anything you can do to create a more personal connection will get your interview off to a memorable start.
Use YouTube – Create a personal video thank you note to send to the interviewer after your meeting. Or put something together that tells a potential employer about your unusual skills and/or creativity.
Promote yourself in unexpected places – It may cost you a little money to put yourself up on a billboard or take an ad in a targeted business magazine. But the investment may be well worth it if it catches the eye of a company executive who appreciates your out-of-the-box thinking.